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Tiger Nuts: A Good Snack For Bone Health!

Have you heard you start losing muscle mass at 25? How about bone mass? Studies suggest peak bone mass occurs between 25 and 30 years of age, then the bone mass is slowly lost (1). Bone loss increases the risk of fractures and osteoporosis (1). There are ways to support bone health, including limiting alcohol consumption, weight-bearing exercises, and consuming supporting nutrients. Nutrients that support bone health include calcium, vitamin D, and protein.


  • Calcium is the main component of bones, providing skeletal strength and structure (2). Calcium needs for 19- to 70-year-old men are 1000 mg (2). Calcium needs for women aged 19-50 are 1000 mg; for women aged 51-70, calcium needs are 1200 mg (2).


  • Vitamin D is an essential factor in maintaining calcium homeostasis by increasing calcium absorption in the intestines to 30 to 40% (3). Vitamin D can also maintain calcium homeostasis by stimulating calcium reabsorption in the kidneys (3).


  • Dietary protein may also play a role in calcium absorption (4). The gastric acid produced from dietary protein has been suggested to increase calcium bioavailability (4). Protein may also aid in bone health by increasing muscle mass (4).


Sweet Aya Bites, also known as tiger nuts, are a great source of calcium providing 7 mg of calcium per serving. One study suggested that tiger nuts may have higher calcium levels than unfortified milk alternatives (5). Aya bites also provide 2 g of plant-based protein per serving.


Aya bites are a great choice for a snack on the go! They provide a carbohydrate, fiber, fat, and protein source making it a complete snack. If you want to add more bulk to your snack, try aya bites with yogurt, smoothies, or with a cheese stick. These additions will provide you with even more calcium if you are using dairy-based products. The nutrient punch of electrolytes supports muscle mass and bone health, which may provide you with long-term benefits!



References:

  1. “Healthy Bones at Every Age - Orthoinfo - Aaos.” OrthoInfo, orthoinfo.aaos.org/en/staying-healthy/healthy-bones-at-every-age/#:~:text=Most%20people%20will%20reach%20their,severe%20bone%20loss%20over%20time. Accessed 30 May 2023.

  2. “Office of Dietary Supplements - Calcium.” NIH Office of Dietary Supplements, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Calcium-HealthProfessional/. Accessed 30 May 2023.

  3. Khazai, Natasha et al. “Calcium and vitamin D: skeletal and extraskeletal health.” Current rheumatology reports vol. 10,2 (2008): 110-7. doi:10.1007/s11926-008-0020-y

  4. Mangano, Kelsey M et al. “Dietary protein is beneficial to bone health under conditions of adequate calcium intake: an update on clinical research.” Current opinion in clinical nutrition and metabolic care vol. 17,1 (2014): 69-74. doi:10.1097/MCO.0000000000000013

  5. Djikeng, Fabrice Tonfack, et al. “Effect of Different Processing Methods on the Chemical Composition, Antioxidant Activity and Lipid Quality of Tiger Nuts (Cyperus Esculentus).” Applied Food Research, vol. 2, no. 2, 2022, p. 100124, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.afres.2022.100124.

  6. Roselló-Soto, Elena, et al. “Nutritional and Microbiological Quality of Tiger Nut Tubers (Cyperus Esculentus), Derived Plant-Based and Lactic Fermented Beverages.” MDPI, 20 Dec. 2018, www.mdpi.com/2311-5637/5/1/3.

  7. Djikeng, Fabrice Tonfack, et al. “Effect of Different Processing Methods on the Chemical Composition, Antioxidant Activity and Lipid Quality of Tiger Nuts (Cyperus Esculentus).” Applied Food Research, vol. 2, no. 2, 2022, p. 100124, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.afres.2022.100124.

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